Testicular Tumors

Testicular tumors are common in young men and usually occur between the age of 25 and 35.  However, it can also affect younger or older men. What is insidious about it:  testicular cancer does usually not cause pain. It is strongly advised to regularly palpate the testicles  and have an  examination as soon as a change, enlargement, or hardening is felt.

 

 

The urological examination consists of a repeated scanning of the testicles, a blood test called the tumor marker, and an ultrasound examination. If a tumor is suspected, a surgical procedure to confirm the diagnosis follows. This procedure requires two small cuts in the groin, to evaluate the testis. Generally, if a tumor is found, the testis have to be removed. If only a single testicle is affected, the aim is to preserve the other testicle.

 

If the tumor is confined to the testicles, treatment is completed with the operation. The patient can leave the hospital treatment usually after one or two days. However, if, however, metastases (secondary tumors) are already present, the surgery is depending on the type of the tumor, usually followed by a pharmacotherapy. The type of medication depends greatly on the extent of metastases and can often completely or partially be done in ambulatory care. In rare cases, a second surgery or radiation might be necessary.

Regardless of the stage of testicular tumor, in most cases can be completely cured. And the sooner it is detected, of course, the better. Early detection increases the chances for recovery, while simultaneously provides the opportunity that only a slight post-treatment is required. An early examination is therefore recommended.